The Anatomy of a Wave, Acceleration Density, and a Theoretical Synthesis

Three of the fundamental equations of quantum physics are:  E=mc2, w=P/mv, and E=Pf, where E=energy, m=mass, c=the velocity of light, w=wavelength, f=frequency, v=velocity, and P=Planck’s constant (Smolin, Einstein’s Unfinished Revolution). If the first two equations are solved for mass then equated, with substitution and canceling such that the absolute minimum of variables remain, the simplest … Continue reading The Anatomy of a Wave, Acceleration Density, and a Theoretical Synthesis

The Origins of Science

Modern objectivity, the approach to knowledge which utilizes theoretical science along with derivative high technology to define our world, increasing the potency of both its own technical procedures and the professional practices that rely on its progress in an accelerating ascent towards the ecological hegemony of our species, is probably our most powerful avenue for … Continue reading The Origins of Science

Theoretical Models of Emotion

There are two main paradigms in the science-based analysis of emotion which currently prevail: a framework viewing emotion as emergent from basic behavioral instincts that can be boiled down further to automatic physiological responses dictated primarily by chemistry of the nervous system, and an opposing account promulging emotion as social construct, an array of conceptualizations superimposed on physical processes, including those … Continue reading Theoretical Models of Emotion

The Origins of a Modern Philosophical Dilemma in Antiquity’s Theorizing

So conflict between the wholly mechanistic vs. nondeterministic view of emotion's causality stares us in the face, a paradox that stalls scientific theorizing and especially institutional integration until concepts are sifted and sorted, deductive choices based on comparison and contrast are made, and our image of reality submerged within the facts, including uncertainties as well as … Continue reading The Origins of a Modern Philosophical Dilemma in Antiquity’s Theorizing

The Permanence of Modern Empiricism Compared to Empiricism of Antiquity

Aristotle's successors sustained his observation-based methods, diversifying within subject matter such as botany, taxonomy, geology, anthropology, physics and logic.  It is clear from the departmentalizing of Aristotelian-influenced academia and its commitment to approaching natural phenomena with realism, as concretions dispersed independent of meaning, that these thinkers had a notion of the empirical similar to the 21st century.  At this … Continue reading The Permanence of Modern Empiricism Compared to Empiricism of Antiquity

Religious Orthodoxy, Then a Philosophical Revolution

Christianity began as one of many “mystery” religions based on faith in the miraculous, a derivation of Judaism that suffered persecutions at the hands of Roman authority with its officially sanctioned paganism, but attracted throngs of followers due to the fortitude of adherents and their proselytizing, eventually becoming a strong enough cultural force to gain recognition from the Roman … Continue reading Religious Orthodoxy, Then a Philosophical Revolution

The First Philosophies of History and of Culture Dynamics

Kant partitioned human experience into 'phenomena', every occurrence within the range of our senses, 'noumena' which lie beyond as “things in themselves”, and the organs of reason, abolishing the chimeras of metaphysics with their age-old failure to specify a locus for the cosmos’ order.  He firmed up once and for all that rationale is in essence a product of the mind’s activity … Continue reading The First Philosophies of History and of Culture Dynamics

The Transition to a Philosophy of Science and Technology

By the close of the 19th century, European institutionalizing of historical analysis was well underway.  Anthropological study was exploring the world, sending out expeditions to research foreign lands, mastering foreign languages, authoring increasingly competent translations into Caucasian tongues, getting a better sense for the way behavior and belief vary by culture, excavating important sites in … Continue reading The Transition to a Philosophy of Science and Technology

An Introductory Analysis of Behavior and Social Theory

1. The Roots of Behavior There are two opposite means of conditioning behaviors: negative and positive reinforcement. Negative reinforcement provokes anxiety and fear, stimulating the amygdala and associated brain regions in conjunction with release of the neurotransmitters adrenaline, glutamate and GABA, a neural event that triggers the hippocampus and additional brain subregions to translate the … Continue reading An Introductory Analysis of Behavior and Social Theory

Immunity and the Institution of Health Care

It is unlikely that a mutation from changes to the genetic code during transcription of the DNA sequence has caused widespread alteration in traits of the human immune system, at least since the origin of our species, unless there is some phenomenon of transmission between individuals we know nothing about.  Beneficial mutations are too rare to alone be an explanation for … Continue reading Immunity and the Institution of Health Care